Category Archives: blogs

66 million productive uses of Twitter?

So I have students who will be required this semester to learn about Twitter. Why you ask? (Actually, those who ask need the same assignment as my students.)

Just yesterday, I saw a great infographic from Mashable (check out the story) which will support me as I explain to those students who ask, “But why do I need to know this?”

The author of the Mashable article not only claims he’s addicted to Twitter, but is searching for a 12-step program to help him break his addiction. Lab42 (https://lab42.com/), an online research firm, conducted the survey on the use of Twitter. The truth is, we use Twitter because someone else we know uses Twitter. Google the question How to use Twitter productively, and you’ll get 66,300,000 opinions.

Whether you are the young grad tweeting about the happenings in city council and around the city government, or the guy who just let us know “just got up, showered and off to work” (whatever!), Twitter offers immediate information. The headline across my desktop this morning reads “Libya: Latest Tweets Say Rebels Are Moving Into Tripoli“. And I tweet to promote a university program and corresponding blog.

So for whatever reasons, Twitter offers 66 million reasons to understand how it works and how it can work for you. Just look at the Resume below and you can see how it brands that user!

New Beginning

The past few weeks have been so emotional, so stressful, so deliberately time consuming, that this blog is the last place I wanted to turn to. Until now. I saw Ric Elias and new that I needed to come back in a renewed way. The three things he learned resonate with me, though not life changing as his, but still renewed. A must watch, from TED.com.

Should I or Shouldn’t I? That’s the question.

The Harvard Business Review sends out daily management tips, and often they are very useful and pertinent. This most recent one is just for you!!!

Do you have an idea? It can’t just be any idea. It has to be something you feel deeply passionate about and no one can talk you out of (because they will try).
Do you have a trusted partner? Starting a business can be lonely. Doing it with someone else, especially if she has complementary skills, can make the road smoother and more fun.
Do you do best without structure? For many, this is the biggest challenge. If you thrive when there is no clear path and lots of uncertainty, it may be time to foster your inner entrepreneur.

Today’s Management Tip was adapted from “Should I Become an Entrepreneur?” by Jeffrey Bussgang. Read the full post and join the discussion.

It’s not over, yet

The year is almost, but not quite over. You still have time to read and prepare for the new year. Not like resolutions for the new year, more like “planning”. I’ve got some new ideas I want to try, some things I’ve been thinking about, and now reading more about. So maybe you could be doing the same. A new business idea? A change? A new direction? Whatever it is, do some planning first.

Here are some suggestions of reading resources, that might lead you to the next year in a new frame of mind.

Blogs:
Upstart Boot Camp

docstock (for businesses)

Smashwords

The Startup MBA

How To Read a Balance Sheet

And for fun and creativity:
The future of print

This should be a beginning. So much more to read, but I’ll catch you on the upside of the year! Happy Holidays and Happy New Year! May it bring you what you want!

Seth: you say it best!

From: Seth Godin’s blog

How can you do it?!
JK asks,

“It’s like, how does anyone start their own business? How is it even possible? How do they deal with the crippling fear and harsh economic realities?”

Some people believe that if you have a good job, you shouldn’t start your own gig, because it’s foolish to give up a job you can’t easily replace.

And some people believe that if you don’t have a great job, it’s foolish to waste time (and the money you can ill afford to lose) starting something when you’d be a lot better off getting a great job or going to school until you do.

And both groups are missing the point.

The people who successfully start independent businesses (franchises, I think are a different thing) do it because we have no real choice in the matter. The voice in our heads won’t shut up until we discover if we’re right, if we can do it, if we can make something happen. This is an art, our art, and to leave it bottled up is a crime.

I guess the real question, JK, is, “How can you not do it?”

An Idea, plan, fund, launch and grow blog

I’ve discovered a new blog and a great resource for entrepreneurs and entrepreneur-wanna-be’s. It’s called upstart bootcamp. I started following them on twitter and end up going to them long before I notice their tweets of the day.

The layout of their site is creative.

Useful information in easily accessible tabs: Idea, plan, fund, launch, grow.  These headings are a mantra for any business. I’m not so interested in the services they offer for a fee.  But their blog is filled with the right kind of advice.

Check it out!

The United States lags behind in Entrepreneurship

I recently read a report on the  performance of the United States on the Global Entrepreneurship and Development Index (GEDI), which captures the  measures of quantitative and qualitative aspects of entrepreneurship. It measures entrepreneurial performance in 71 countries. The United States appears among the top entrepreneurial economies and ranks third on the GEDI.

It performs very well on the aspirations index but lags somewhat on the attitudes and activity indexes. At the pillar level, the United States is strong in startup skills, competition, and new technology but weak in cultural support, tech sector, and high-growth business. The reasons for showing weakness in these last indexes is This paper looks at the performance of the United States on the Global Entrepreneurship and Development Index (GEDI), which captures the contextual features of entrepreneurship.

The index builds on and improves earlier measures by capturing quantitative and qualitative aspects of entrepreneurship. It measures entrepreneurial performance in 71 countries over three sub-indexes, 14 pillars, and 31 individual and institutional variables. The United States appears among the top entrepreneurial economies and ranks third on the GEDI. Who ranks at the top according to the new GEDI? Denmark and Canada appear at the top of the overall rank.

The US performs very well on the aspirations index but lags somewhat on the attitudes and activity indexes. At the pillar level, the United States is strong in startup skills, competition, and new technology but weak in cultural support, tech sector, and high-growth business. The chief reasons for these  weaknesses are the changing political environment and international volatility, the bursting of the tech sector bubble of the 1990s, the recent recession, and the improving performance of other counties.

My take away from this report is that we need to better harness entrepreneurship.  Kauffman’s Data Maven site is a blog where you can find analysis on new data developments.

Stay tuned also at www.unleashingideas.org where Global Entrepreneurship Week in mid November will report on policy gatherings across the globe that discuss this paucity of data. San Antonio and the Entrepreneurs Organization will host our own Global Entrepreneurship conference on November 18.  More to come on this.